Best Practices for Engaging With Your Employees to Boost Business Outcomes

I find that meeting with workers on a regular basis builds rapport and opens lines of communication, so I host quarterly InfoCision employee forums. I invite workers to participate voluntarily, and they’ve become an eager and receptive audience. After all, we share information pertinent to the business that supports our livelihoods. I gain valuable insights from them and have seen that my efforts inspire their enthusiastic ongoing contributions toward company goals.

I’m not alone in determining that employee engagement works wonders for businesses—including boosting morale and retention. Case in point, Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric, has been quoted as saying, “No company, small or large, can win over the long run without energized employees who believe in the mission and understand how to achieve it.”

Many companies now abide by the premise that successful leadership requires conversing with employees—vs. commanding and controlling them from high up on the corporate ladder. A primary benefit of this approach is how it enables large or growing organizations to function like much smaller ones. That is, they regain performance advantages such as tight strategic alignment, operational flexibility and high employee engagement.

Even if the distance between you and your employees makes personal appearances impossible, making a virtual connection should still be a priority to ensure that you foster a conversational culture. Staying close mentally and emotionally will lead all parties to trust each other, and engender more honest exchanges of ideas.

People matter—perhaps more than ever—in today’s companies. Their contributions are directly linked to company success. The effort they are willing to contribute toward that success has a lot to do with their level of engagement. Organizations that show they care, including making things happen based on employee input and encouraging good feelings about the work being done, often have more-productive workers. Employees who feel appreciated will make their customers feel appreciated as well.

Here are some ways that opening a dialogue between leaders and workers benefits organizations:

  • Develops trust—leads to substantive and rewarding exchanges of views
  • Signals respect—opens the door to issues that might not otherwise be raised or resolved
  • Improves leadership performance—provides personal input (if solicited anonymously) for growth
  • Closes gaps—promotes open and fluid dialog between leaders and employees, leading to social thinking and spontaneous give and take for more efficient communication
  • Enhances inclusion—primes engaged employees to become brand content producers and ambassadors
  • Confers order and meaning—directs conversations to converge on a particular company intent or aim

I like to start my forums with a fun icebreaker to make everyone feel at ease and encourage open communication. And I make sure that conversations aren’t restricted to work so that I can get to know my Communicators beyond what they do for the business. I welcome their honest insights and concerns and answer any questions they have for me. I’ve gotten to know many Communicators by name and have been privileged to share in their personal stories.

Typically, I meet with groups based on their length of service—under six months, six to 12 months, and over one year—because they present with such different interests and needs. To gather initial thoughts, I survey participants on their topics of interest; these surveys are also brought back to headquarters for our executives to review.

Within InfoCision, we also use companywide surveys to expand upon the insights we gain from the small group forums. Surveys are a highly valuable tool for helping to identify and resolve issues. Look for an upcoming blog from me on objectives and best practices for conducting internal surveys.

I’ve found getting to know my workers, both from forums and surveys, and attending to their concerns has added to my personal growth and business acumen. As a leader for your organization, consider engaging more personally with your employees; it’s a sure way to bring your business to the next level.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Change Your Contact Center for the Better As the Season Changes

Change is all around us. The leaves are falling. The air is getting crisp. As we turn the corner into fall, feed off of the seasonal energy and update your contact center strategy.

Here are some practical steps you can take to inspire your team and boost attitude—and performance—in your contact center:

Update your call scripts: Customers pick up on the smallest details when speaking with your Communicators. So it’s vital to ensure your Communicators are inspired and excited during phone interactions. To boost enthusiasm, try updating your call scripts. You can even hold a meeting, and ask for direct feedback from your Communicators about specific areas they think should change. Get a sense of which lines are working, and which can be improved. Doing so will make your Communicators feel like they are part of the team. What’s more, it will make them think actively about the language they use when speaking with customers.

Bring in some fresh faces: The busy holiday rush will be here before you know it. And when this happens, your department may need to scale to handle larger call volumes. This year, be proactive and hire early. This will give you plenty of time to onboard and train your new hires, and to make sure they are well- prepared for the busy season. Plus, your new Communicators will bring a wave of energy and enthusiasm into your department.

Improve your KPIs: Take a hard look at your contact center metrics. Are there any trends that need to disappear along with the summer heat? Take active measures to reduce your abandon rates by tweaking your interactive voice response system or implementing a callback feature. You could also work with your Communicators to look for ways of improving first call resolution rates. KPIs may seem intimidating, but by making them a priority you could significantly boost your customer service ratings.

Innovate: When is the last time you integrated a new technology into your contact center? There are many new customer relationship management (CRM) solutions that you can use to streamline customer support, like issue tracking systems (which can capture and follow customer challenges), multichannel solutions (for communicating with customers over multiple platforms), and knowledge bases (which help Communicators share information among themselves). If your CRM solutions are up to date, it’s worth considering other small investments to make your Communicators happier and more productive. For example, you could consider implementing new headsets, phones or even chairs. It’s amazing how performance can improve when workers are comfortable at their seats.

Remember that you don’t need to have a massive departmentwide overhaul to enact meaningful change. Simply coming to work with a positive, can-do attitude will inspire others to feel the same. Let the winds of change blow through your contact center and drive improvements this season!

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Tips for Offering Feedback in the Contact Center

As a contact center leader, you spend a great deal of time observing Communicators during customer interactions. In this way, you have become quite familiar with the individual strengths and weaknesses of your team members. Your job is to convey these observations to your Communicators on a regular basis and help them perform their best.

Understand, though, that what you say to your Communicators, and the way you say it, will go a long way in shaping the culture of your contact center. Regardless of your intent, constructive criticism can actually be very destructive if poorly communicated. It can undermine the working relationship of those involved, making it less likely that they will be able to collaborate well in the future. Harsh, or inept, criticism has also been found to increase the likelihood of future conflicts, as well as directly impair the ability of people to do the work for which they have been criticized.

So, rather than attempting to give Communicators constructive criticism, try approaching them with positive feedback and coaching support. By doing so, there will be no hurt pride or animosity in your contact center. Act as a mentor and emphasize the Communicator’s strengths. Granted, sometimes you have to deliver criticism—in which case, break your feedback down into three segments, the Praise-Improve-Praise technique.

Begin by highlighting your employees’ skills, and express your appreciation for their work. Then, transition into the improvement stage. Be clear, but considerate, on the areas that they can improve upon. Reiterate both the praise and the improvement, and conclude with a final praise—this is crucial to ensure that the Communicator feels appreciated and welcomed.

Communicators who feel appreciated are more likely to lengthen their tenure with your company, reducing turnover, which is expensive and bad for team morale. Plus, when Communicators do move on, they will be more likely to post positive employee reviews on employment websites, helping you to attract qualified workers in the future.

Use these guiding principles when delivering your Praise-Improve-Praise conversation to employees:

Offer feedback privately: Generally speaking, direct feedback is best given in private, even when it is positive in nature, to avoid embarrassing the Communicator in front of others.

Avoid accusations: Even if you are certain that a Communicator is in the wrong about something, don’t hurl accusations at him or her. Ease into the topic at hand, and give the person a chance to explain his or her reasoning for taking a particular course of action. Ask questions, and try to figure out the root cause of an issue.

Be genuine: Reinforce the fact that you are trying to help the Communicator improve. Tell a story about a time when you made a similar mistake. Then, explain what you learned from it. The Communicator will appreciate your honesty and willingness to share your story.

Explain your goals: After you coach your Communicator about the issue, explain how the conversation fits into his or her long-term future with the company. At the end of the conversation, lay out some small steps the employee can take to move closer to his or her ultimate goal.

Have the right mindset: Before you pull an employee aside to provide coaching or support, make sure you have the right attitude. The conversation will be smoother and more productive if you are feeling positive and non-confrontational.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Walk a Mile in Your Agents’ Shoes

Here’s a management technique that’s been heard around the world: Unobtrusively, a manager wanders around the workplace, keeping his or her eyes and ears open for an employee who’s doing something right. After observing one such activity, the manager reinforces that behavior with a one-minute praising, which essentially consists of telling people specifically what they did right, how it made the manager feel when he or she witnessed the behavior, and how that behavior benefits the company.

That’s an idea from the best-selling business fable by Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson, “The One Minute Manager,” a book that’s sold more than 50 million copies worldwide.

This idea was expanded upon in the popular television show, Undercover Boss. The premise of the show is that executives take on their employees’ jobs for a time, and while the activity sometimes leads to reprimands—but more often praise—the underlying theory is the same: Observing your employees in their natural setting gives you a truer sense of how your employees perform on a daily basis, and provides managers with a simple way of encouraging people to do better more often.

As the leader of a contact center, it’s easy to get lost in our own point of view. We often see our employees from our own vantage point, from the perspective of someone who’s just reviewed call analytics, or overheard a harsher-than-necessary tone, or implemented new technology and training processes. We forget that our Communicators are seeing things from the other side: as someone who’s having a rough day, struggling to incorporate a complicated tool into a challenging customer interaction, or multi-tasking to get more done.

Crossing Over as a Management Tool

It’s important to take time occasionally to see things from the other side. When was the last time you handled customer calls for an entire workday? Spending a day in your Communicators’ shoes will give you valuable firsthand experience of what they deal with every day on the job. You might find that they’re lacking a useful tool that would help them do their job better. Or, you might see opportunities for additional training, working conditions that could be improved, or processes that should be modified.

For example, one executive on Undercover Boss experienced firsthand the negative impact of his cost-cutting measures when he had to spend a long, hot day in the warehouse without water. “Company picnics are nice,” an employee told him, “but take care of us on the job instead.”

One caveat here: Your focus should be on fixing problems, not people.

Another benefit of spending time on the other side is that your employees will be more likely to buy into your mission if they see that you “get it.” You understand the opportunities and challenges they are facing, and you understand their reality. Effective leaders inspire trust, which is more easily done if you feel a genuine connection to those you are leading. You’ll also see an elevated sense of collaboration, where Communicators are open to an exchange of ideas when it comes to the workplace.

If it’s simply not feasible to take to the phones for a day, consider inviting employees to share feedback about their jobs and provide solutions. You may get complaints, but you’ll also get some valuable thoughts about how to fix things—and what to fix. If you do choose to ask for feedback, make sure employees feel safe in sharing their thoughts or the entire exercise will be fruitless.

You may be surprised at what you discover from a trip to the other side. Among the many revelations you’re likely to have, one will surely be a renewed sense of appreciation for your Communicators.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Three Ways to Celebrate Summer All Year Long In the Contact Center

Summertime brings to mind the sound of waves gently crashing on the beach, the smell of burgers on the grill and the feeling of excitement from lighting firecrackers on the Fourth of July.

You can capture such positive summer sensations in your contact center all yearlong—delighting and satisfying employees and customers—by employing a few strategic best practices, as follows:

Provide continuous professional development: What keeps employees satisfied and engaged at their jobs is the feeling of constant growth and the opportunity to learn. Providing professional development resources to employees of all levels will enable them to continuously work toward new goals, improve their skills and discover new strengths throughout the course of their careers. Not only will this make your employees happier, it will improve the quality of customer care that they deliver thereby retaining more customers.

Offer team building exercises: The best part of summertime is spending quality time with friends and family soaking up the sun. Transfer this feeling of togetherness to your contact center family by holding more team building events so that team members can strengthen their relationships. This is also a great way for upper managers to interact socially with employees with whom they may not otherwise get the chance to engage. Like professional development courses, team building exercises and events will give team members something positive to look forward to throughout the year.

Utilize intuitive technology: The only thing that could improve your Communicators’ top-notch customer care skills is intuitive technology. It’s true; you can enhance Communicator performance by integrating data analytics tools such as predictive analytics, skills-based routing and marketing segmentation to optimize their abilities. Integrating best-in-class technology into your customer care strategy is the cherry on top of your banana split.

Let your customer care shine this summer—and all year long for that matter—by employing these three effective strategies.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Ways to Make Morale a Priority

It’s hard to pin down a definition of high or low morale in the workplace, but you know it when you see it. A team with high morale is confident they can do the job, disciplined about performing it, and motivated to tackle whatever comes their way. On the other hand, low morale looks just the opposite—your agents may be working, but there’s no sense of enthusiasm or positivity.

It’s no secret that morale has a major impact on the workplace, particularly in the customer care arena. In a setting with low morale, Communicators aren’t likely to go the extra mile in their service efforts or present a pleasant demeanor during customer interactions. Customers can sense when the person on the other end of the line is unhappy, a feeling that will permeate the entire exchange. So even if the idea of raising morale seems like a nebulous concept, its benefits are clearly measurable in the strength of your bottom line.

If you’re noticing an increase in turnover, frequent employee absences, or an undercurrent of conflicts or complaints, try some of these morale-boosting strategies:

  • Reconnect with your Communicators. Practice “management by walking around,” so you can connect with employees spontaneously. Unplanned conversations could yield impromptu suggestions, ideas, and the sharing of thoughts in the moment. Make sure you’re listening.
  • Say “thank you” more often. Reward Communicators frequently for a job well done, which could mean anything from saying “great job” or “thanks” to things like giving gift certificates or awarding flextime hours.
  • Make staff development a priority. Hold regular one-on-one meetings to understand individual needs and skills, and provide training and development opportunities as often as possible. Create formal ways for staff members to learn from one another.
  • Show Communicators the results of their hard work. Share positive feedback with all agents, and consider sharing any good news related to the clients you work for. After all, their success wouldn’t be possible without the hard work of your Communicators.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Why Positive Reinforcement is Essential to Communicators’ Success

Customer care representatives have a mentally grueling and incredibly tough job.  While other employees can hide in their cubicles when they’re having a tough day, Communicators must constantly display a sunny and positive demeanor when speaking to customers.

Unfortunately, Communicators don’t always get the credit they deserve. In fact, it’s rare for customers to shell out many “thank yous” to customer care professionals. After all, customers expect high-quality customer care experiences.

Not receiving positive reinforcement for a job well done, however, can be hard on Communicators at times. It’s common for Communicators to feel like they are running a marathon without anyone on the sidelines cheering them on, which can negatively impact their daily work performance and overall well-being.

In fact, a study of over 1,700 employees conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) indicated that more than half of all employees intended to search for new jobs because they felt underappreciated and undervalued.

Rather than sit back and wait for customers to show appreciation toward your Communicators, take it upon yourself to do so. Providing positive reinforcement can be achieved through small or big gestures.

For example, simply taking the time each month to thank your team or individual team members for a job well done can go a long way. Or perhaps you want to show more appreciation by taking your employees on a fun outing each quarter to reward them for their success.

Whether you choose to go small or big doesn’t matter. What matters is showing your Communicators that you appreciate their hard work and value them an as an employee. In doing so, you will create a more positive work environment, which leads to more productive and successful employees.

So how will you give a big “thank you” to your team of hard working Communicators this month?

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

 

Improve Employee Engagement With Social Media Integration

Today’s digitally savvy customers are dialing back on 1-800 numbers and increasing their use of social media when contacting brands. More and more customers are opting to communicate with brands via social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, as opposed to traditional channels.

In fact, research from McKinsey shows that 30 percent of social media users prefer social care. In particular, the percentage of people who have used Twitter for customer service leapt nearly 70 percent, from 22 to 37 percent from 2013-14.

To take advantage of the popularity of social media, more companies are launching employee advocacy programs, which entail the promotion of an organization by its staff members. According to Altimeter Group’s “The 2015 State of Social Business Report” interest in employee advocacy has grown 191 percent since 2013, with 45 percent of respondents naming it a top external objective.

So what exactly is an employee advocacy program and how does it work? Essentially, it’s a program that is meant to generate positive awareness about a brand through social media. Designated brand advocates will discuss their positive experiences at work with their social media followers. For example, they might post a picture of a company outing to give customers a look into their company’s culture.

There are tons of benefits to launching an employee advocacy program. From a marketing perspective, companies experience an uptick in social media exposure. Oftentimes, employees have a much wider and diverse social media following, which means they are able to expose your brand to customers that you might not have the opportunity to reach before.

What’s more, these programs help attract and retain new customers as well as build trust. As past studies have shown, customers are more likely to trust product or service recommendations from friends, family or peers rather than a company itself. In addition, when customers have meaningful interactions with employees, a level or trust is formed.

Perhaps the most valuable benefit employee advocacy programs afford businesses is employee engagement. That’s right; employee advocacy programs don’t just benefit marketing, they also benefit the customer care department as well.

Giving employees the opportunity to advocate on behalf of your brand demonstrates to them that you trust them and think of them as invaluable members of your brand. In turn, employees are more likely to feel engaged and loyal to the brand. And when employees are more engaged they deliver better customer care. What’s more, employee advocacy programs encourage internal communication and collaboration, both of which keep employees highly engaged within your business.

While launching an employee advocacy program is a big undertaking—after all, there are a lot of steps to choosing the right employees and building out clear guidelines and goals—it can help your business improve its digital presence and increase employee engagement.  It’s a win-win situation for both customers and your bottom line. So what are you waiting for?

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

Rest and Relaxation: A Contact Center’s Secret Weapon

Simply put, the role of a Communicator is no walk in the park. Not only are they tasked with maintaining a positive and professional demeanor day in and day out, but they are also responsible for dealing with difficult situations customers every now and then, which can be downright draining.

To ensure that Communicators can keep up with the demand of contact center life, it’s important that they have a healthy work life balance. After all, when employees are stressed they can quickly become burnt out, which makes them less productive and sometimes less pleasant.

Below are various ways that you can ensure that your Communicators are getting the right amount of rest and relaxation they need to recharge and enjoy their jobs.

  • Make coming to work fun: Communicators should look forward to coming to work, not dread it. Make coming to work fun by planning fun activities for employees. For example, implement a “snack day” in which employees are responsible for bringing in their favorite homemade snack.
  • Create a great environment: No one wants to come to work in which the environment is high stress. Create an environment in which employees feel comfortable and relaxed. While it goes without saying, employees and superiors should always be respectful of one another. Make sure that you have a code of conduct in which everyone abides.
  • Celebrate successes: Did your team break its record of first-time call resolutions? Or did an employee save a customer from cancelling? These are great successes that should be celebrated. You would be surprised at how far a simple ‘thank you’ or recognition can go.

Rest and relaxation is very important for all employees, but this is especially true for those in the customer care sector. Implement some of the ideas above to give your Communicators the work life balance they need to better service customers.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.

 

It’s Time for Some Preemptive Contact Center Spring Cleaning

The flowers might not exactly be blooming yet, but there’s no reason why contact center leaders shouldn’t be prepared for the forthcoming season by doing a little early spring cleaning.

So what exactly does spring cleaning involve in the contact center? Below are a few things that you can do clear the “cobwebs” out, liven up your employees and improve the overall customer experience:

  • Refresh Communicators: The winter can take a toll on Communicators. After all, the winter is filled with several busy months, in particular the holidays. Communicators will often need a boost to get them back into the groove. We suggest doing some team building or educational activities to reignite the fire. For example, bring in a special guest to give them a talk on new customer care trends or have them attend an online seminar.
  • Implement New Technology: Now is the perfect time to make good on those New Year resolutions you made back in January. Perhaps, for example, you pledged to implement new technology that would better assist Communicators and streamline internal processes. If you haven’t already, start researching products and vendors. Getting the ball rolling on big project like this is always the hardest part.
  • Revise Mission Statement: Have your core values and goals changed since the New Year? If you answered “yes,” it might be time that you updated your mission statement to reflect your future goals. Work with the appropriate people to build an internal campaign that will help get everyone onboard. For example, creating visuals that depict your core values and putting them up throughout the office is a great way to remind employees of goals.

Spring is fast approaching. Get a head start on your spring cleaning initiatives by following the tips and tricks above.

Steve Brubaker began his career at InfoCision in 1985. In his current role as Chief of Staff and as a member of the Executive Team, he is responsible for HR, internal and external communications, and manages the company’s legal and compliance departments. Brubaker is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the DMA, SOCAP, and PACE. He also donates his time to serve on several university boards, including the Executive Advisory Board for The Taylor Institute for Direct Marketing at The University of Akron and The University of Akron Foundation Board. He is a frequent speaker for national events and has also been honored with a number of awards and recognitions for his contributions to the call center industry.